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Condiments: Paleo Dry Rub/Spice Mix Recipes

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Parmesan Cheese Substitutes

Rawmesan Cheeze

I use cashews for their color, although pine nuts work just as well. If you
don't mind a darker-colored Rawmesan, feel free to use your favorite nut or
seed instead.

1/2 cup cashews, ground into a powder
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon sea salt

Mix the ingredients together in a small bowl.

Will keep for 5 days in the fridge.

From: Ani's Raw Food Essentials by Ani Phyo.
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Parmazano Cheeze

   1 c  Nutritional yeast flakes [may not be GRAP]
 1/2 c  Raw almonds, blanched and patted dry
 1/2 ts Salt

Place all ingredients in a food processor, and process for several minutes
until the almonds are very finely ground. Store in a tightly sealed 
container in the refrigerator.

From: The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook by Joanne Stepaniak
via: [Free-Mealers]sugg for cheese-VERY LONG-several recipes for you!
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Parmesan Cheese Substitute

1 c Sesame seeds; lightly
1/2 ts Salt
1/2 ts Onion powder
1/4 c Yeast flakes
1/4 ts Garlic powder

Put all ingredients into a dry liquefier (blender). Mill until seeds are
milled and ingredients are combined. Yield = 1 1/4 cups

Recipe by: The Joy of Cooking Naturally, page 21
From: BigOven
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Vegan "Parmesan" Cheese Substitute

3/4 c blanched almonds
1/4 c sesame seeds
1/3 c nutritional yeast
3/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp onion powder
1/4 tsp garlic powder

Blend all ingredients in a blender until there are no more noticeable nut
pieces. Store in an airtight container in the fridge. Recycling a used
parmesan cheese container works great. May adjust nuts and yeast according
to taste.

By Joan Hunt. From: Just A Pinch: Recipes
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Nut Based Mixes

Fish Spice Mix

This spice mixture is incredibly versatile. We highly recommend it for 
sole, turbot, or any similar fish simply panfried.

24g  Hazelnuts, peeled, roasted, and coarsely ground
22g  Sesame seeds, toasted
6g   Coriander seeds, toasted
5g   White poppy seeds, toasted
2g   Dried ginger, ground [Powdered ginger]
1.6g Salt
1.2g Dried chamomile, ground

Prepare ingredients as noted.
Combine in food processor or mortar.
Grind to coarse powder.
Vacuum seal to preserve aroma.
Refrigerate until use.

From page 5-154 in Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking
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Persian-Style Nut Rub

Here is a variation on the zaatar spice mixture that is used in the Middle
East for a variety of culinary purposes. This version, like those of Saudi
Arabia and the Gulf States, features ground nuts. I've left out the sumac
(a sour, earthy-tasting spice that is quite difficult to find in the U.S.)
and have substituted fresh herbs for the dried thyme usually used in Middle
Eastern versions. I like the fresh herbs with nuts.

This rub is great for coating grilled fish or chicken; it creates a nice
seared crust with a unique nutty flavor.

1/4 cup sesame seeds
1/4 cup ground pistachios
2 tablespoons ground almonds
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh oregano
1 tablespoon ground allspice
Salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste

Using a nonstick sauté pan, roast the sesame seeds, pistachios, and almonds
separately over medium heat, shaking the pan frequently to prevent burning,
until they are lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes each.

When all the nuts are roasted, combine them with the remaining ingredients
and, using a coffee grinder or blender, process until fine, about the
consistency of coarse meal. Makes about 1 cup.

From: Big Flavors of the Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger and John
      Willoughby
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Macadamia Nut Dukkah

Originating from Egypt, dukkah is a dry blend of nuts and spices most
commonly used to season flat breads.

In this recipe I have given dukkah an Aussie twist with the use of
delicious macadamia nuts.

It can be sprinkled on salads, fried eggs, or roasted vegetables. Dukkah
can also be used as a crust for chicken or fish.

1/2 cup of raw, unsalted macadamia nuts
1/4 cup of cup of raw, unsalted pine nuts
1/4 cup of raw sesame seeds
2 Tbsp coriander seeds
2 Tbsp cumin seeds
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 tsp of flaked sea salt [optional]
good quality extra virgin olive oil for serving

Heat a medium frying pan over medium heat. Add the macadamia nuts and pine
nuts and lightly toast, stirring, for 1-2 minutes. Place the toasted nuts
in a food processor and process until finely chopped and they resemble
coarse crumbs. Transfer nut mixture to a large bowl.

Add the sesame seeds to the frying pan and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes
or until golden. Add to the bowl with the nut mixture.

Place coriander seeds and cumin seeds in frying pan over medium heat, and
cook, stirring frequently, for 1-2 minutes or until they release their
aromas and begin to pop. Transfer seeds to a mortar and pestle and pound
until finely crushed.

Add the crushed spices, pepper and salt to the nut mixture and mix well.

Can serve macadamia nut dukkah with good quality extra virgin olive oil.

Store dukkah in an airtight and sterile jar for up to 1 month.

Recipe by Syrie Wongkaew, former About.com Guide
Found at: About.com: Australian / New Zealand Food
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Pistachio Dukkah (Egyptian Spice Mix)

40g (1/4 cup) sesame seeds
75g (1/2 cup) pistachio kernels, finely chopped
3 tsp ground coriander
3 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 tsp salt [optional]

Place the sesame seeds in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat.
Cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes or until toasted and golden.

Add the pistachio, coriander, cumin and pepper and cook, stirring, for 1
minute or until aromatic. Stir in the salt and set aside to cool.

Recipe by Michelle Southan. Australian Good Taste - August 2009, Page 101 
From: Taste.com.au
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Ben Dearnley

How to Make Dukkah

Dukkah is a spicy mix made with seeds and nuts that is used for dipping,
olive oil tastings or for seasoning meats or vegetarian equivalents. This
version uses a wide array of nuts and seeds and is delicious. This recipe
makes 2 1/4 cups of dukkah.

1/2 cup sesame seeds
1/2 cup sunflower seeds
1/2 cup pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup almonds
1/2 cup hazelnuts
1/4 cup cumin seeds
1/4 cup coriander seeds
1 tbsp paprika (ground)
1 1/2 tsp salt (flakes)
1 1/2 tsp turmeric

Preheat the oven to a moderate temperature (180ºC / 350ºF).

Roast the nuts and seeds on the baking trays. Put the seeds on one tray and
the nuts on the other.

Keep an eye on the seeds and nuts every few minutes. Remove them from the
oven when they have darkened slightly. This will take about 10 minutes.
Allow to cool.

Set up the food processor. Grind the nuts and seeds together, along with
the salt, turmeric and paprika. Do not over-process - the mixture must have
some texture and not be too oily or powdered.

Serve or season:

Serve in bowls for dipping. Cut small slices of a paleo food and place
different types of olive oil in small bowls. The idea is to use the food to
dip in the olive oil of choice, then dip in the dukkah for additional
flavour. This has become a popular choice at wine tasting events where
olive oil is also on offer for tasting.

Use to season. Dukkah makes an excellent seasoning for meats or fish
fillets - apply to oiled meat prior to roasting, baking or frying or mix
with flour for coating fish fillets.

Tips:

Process on the "pulse" button.

If you do not have a food processor, use a mortar and pestle or a hand-held
spice grinder.

If storing the dukkah, keep in airtight containers. Leave dukkah in a cool
place, such as a pantry or even the refrigerator. Keep out of direct light.
The flavour will decrease over time and the mixture should be consumed
within 2 months.

From: wikiHow
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Dry Rubs/Mixes: Without Chili

Essence (Emeril's Creole Seasoning)

2 1/2 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dried leaf oregano
1 tablespoon dried thyme

Combine all ingredients thoroughly and store in an airtight jar or 
container. Yield: about 2/3 cup.

From Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking by Emeril Lagasse and Jessie Tirsch
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Sazón (Spice) with Coriander and Annatto

1 1/4 tsp equals one packet of Sazon in recipe

1 tsp Salt
1 tsp Garlic Powder
1 tsp Cumin
1 tsp Coriander
1 tsp Annatto

From: BigOven
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Dry Rub for Fish

This rub is suitable for all firm-textured fish.

1 teaspoon noniodized salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Finely grated peel of 2 lemons (about 1 tablespoon)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or
  2 teaspoons dill weed

In a small bowl, combine all ingredients. Use immediately or store in a 
container with a tight-fitting lid. Cover tightly; refrigerate up to 3 
weeks. To use, rub over surface and in cavity offish to be grilled or 
smoked; refrigerate 30 to 60 minutes, then cook. Makes enough rub for 2 
pounds of fish.

From: Grilling & Barbecuing: Best-ever Recipes for Meats, Vegetables,
Fruits, Breads & Desserts-Indoors or Out! by John Phillip Carroll and 
Charlotte Walker
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Dry Rub for Pork and Lamb

Rinse the marinade off if you wish, but our preference is to leave it on.

1-1/2 tablespoons coarse salt or kosher salt or
  1 tablespoon table salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme or
  1 teaspoon dried leaf thyme, crumbled
2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary or
  2 teaspoons dried rosemary, crumbled
3 large garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice or cloves, for pork only

In a small bowl, combine salt, pepper, thyme, rosemary and garlic. If dry
marinade will be used for pork, add allspice or cloves. Use immediately or
pour into a container with a tight-fitting lid. Cover tightly; refrigerate
up to 3 weeks. To use, rub evenly over surface of meat. Place seasoned meat
in a large bowl; cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours or up to 24 hours,
then grill. Makes about 1/4 cup or enough dry rub for a 4-pound roast or 4
pounds of steaks or chops.

From: Grilling & Barbecuing: Best-ever Recipes for Meats, Vegetables,
Fruits, Breads & Desserts-Indoors or Out!
by John Phillip Carroll and Charlotte Walker
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Herb Rub for Fish

You'll be pleased with the marvelous flavor result when you use this herb 
rub on fish.

1 tablespoon paprika
1-1/2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme or
  1/2 teaspoon dried leaf thyme, crumbled
1-1/2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh oregano or
  1/2 teaspoon dried leaf oregano, crumbled
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon red (cayenne) pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

In a small bowl, combine all ingredients. Use immediately or pour into a 
container with a tight-fitting lid. Cover tightly; refrigerate up to 3 
weeks. To use, rub evenly over surface and cavity of fish. Cover and 
refrigerate 30 minutes; then grill. Makes 2 to 3 tablespoons.

Adapted from: Grilling & Barbecuing: Best-ever Recipes for Meats,
Vegetables, Fruits, Breads & Desserts-Indoors or Out!
by John Phillip Carroll and Charlotte Walker
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Herb Rub for Lamb

Marvelous flavors to complement lamb.

2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary or
  2 teaspoons dried rosemary, crumbled
Finely grated peel of 1 lemon (about 1-1/2 teaspoons)
1 teaspoon salt [orginally 2 teaspoons]
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried leaf thyme, crumbled
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
2 large garlic cloves, finely chopped

In a small bowl, combine rosemary, lemon peel, salt, pepper, thyme, 
allspice and garlic. To use, rub herb mixture over surface of lamb; cover 
and refrigerate at least 2 hours or up to 12 hours, then grill. Makes 
about 1/4 cup or enough dry rub for 3 to 4 pounds of lamb.

From: Grilling & Barbecuing: Best-ever Recipes for Meats, Vegetables,
Fruits, Breads & Desserts-Indoors or Out!
by John Phillip Carroll and Charlotte Walker
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Paanch Phoran

This uniquely Bengali (East Indian) spice mix is used to season many 
dishes. It is a blend of five (paanch) spices and lends a lovely aroma when
added to a dish.

Cumin seeds
Fennel seeds
Nigella seeds
Fenugreek seeds
Mustard seeds

Mix all the above in equal quantities and store in an airtight container.

From: About.com: Indian Food
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Middle Eastern Spice Rub

When spice mixtures are discussed, the intricate and varied masalas of
India always seem to get the most attention. They are indeed wonderful, but
if you walk into any Persian market, you will realize that the cooks of the
Middle East are also serious devotees of the craft. This recipe is a
variation on a mixture called baharat, which is used in the Middle East as
an all purpose spicer-upper. To facilitate its use as a dry rub, I have
increased the paprika a bit. This mixture is great as a rub on grilled or
roasted chicken and will give the bird a crisp, flavorful crust.

2 tablespoons crushed coriander seeds
2 tablespoons crushed cumin seeds
1/4 cup paprika
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon ground allspice
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cloves

Combine all the ingredients in a nonstick saute pan and heat over medium
heat for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. The heat
will bring out flavors of the individual spices and blend them together.
This mixture will maintain its potency for about 6 weeks if stored in an
airtight container in a cool, dark place. Makes about 1 cup.

From: Big Flavors of the Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger and John
      Willoughby
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Moroccan Spice Mix

2 tablespoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon ground coriander (better if fresh ground from seeds)
1 tablespoon ground ginger
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

Toss all spices together and store in an airtight container.

This is a companion recipe to Parsnips with Moroccan Spices

Recipe Courtesy of Fresh with Anna Olson show.
Found at FoodNetwork.ca
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Spice Rub for Oily Fish

This rub is particularly good on bluefish, tuna, or mackerel because they
have the character to stand up to a strong-flavored mix of spices. Covered
and stored in a cool, dark place, this rub will keep for about 6 weeks.

1 tablespoons fennel seeds
1 tablespoons coriander seeds
1 tablespoons freshly cracked pepper (white if available)
1 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoons ground turmeric
1 teaspoons cayenne pepper
1 tablespoons dry mustard

In a medium-size bowl, combine all the ingredients and mix thoroughly.
Makes about 1/2 cup.

Adapted from: Big Flavors of the Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger and John 
              Willoughby
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Jamaican Curry Powder

In the 1800s Jamaican curry was a kind of coconut rundown made by taking
the jelly of a very young coconut, boiling it in its own water with a
little cinnamon and adding curry powder to taste. Introduced by the
British, it was not very common among poor Jamaicans.

That was before the East Indians came to Jamaica as indentured servants.
Today, curries are very much a part of Jamaican cooking. Curry shrimp,
curry lobster and the world-famous Jamaican curry goat are popular all over
the island. Jamaican curry powder tends to be a tad hotter than Madras
blends, with more hot mustard. Scotch bonnet peppers and Jamaican ginger
powder add to the heat of Jamaican curries.

Making your own curry powder may seem a little extreme, but it is a
wonderful lesson in the interplay of flavors and how the whole is greater
than the sum of its parts. In Jamaica, all the ingredients listed here are
available in the wild or at the market. By mixing and grinding spices in a
mortar you will come to understand the amazing difference between
freshly ground and store-bought curry.

If you can't find one or two of the ingredients, your curry powder will
still be usable, provided turmeric is not one of the missing ingredients. A
rhizome like ginger, but smaller and more yellow, turmeric is essential for
a good curry powder.

5 parts ground turmeric
4 parts coriander seeds
3 parts cayenne
1 part  ground ginger
1 part  grated nutmeg
1 part  whole allspice
3 parts fenugreek seeds
2 parts cumin seeds
2 parts whole black pepper
2 parts star anise or aniseed
2 parts yellow mustard seeds
1 part  whole cloves

Combine all the ingredients. Store the curry powder in a tightly sealed jar
away from light and heat.

From: Traveling Jamaica With Knife, Fork & Spoon
      by Robb Walsh and Jay McCarthy
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Curried Jerky

1 tsp salt
1-1/2 tsp curry powder
1/4 tsp pepper
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/8 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp ground ginger
1/16 tsp ground cloves
1/8 tsp ground cumin

From: rec.food.preserving
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Moroccan Dry Marinade

   2      teaspoons     black pepper
   1      teaspoon      onion powder
   2      teaspoons     garlic salt
     1/2  teaspoon      cayenne pepper
   1      teaspoon      ground cinnamon
   1      teaspoon      ground coriander
     1/2  teaspoon      dried thyme
   1      teaspoon      ground ginger
   1      tablespoon    minced lemon zest
   1/2    tablespoon    honey

Rub onto food and let sit for an hour.
Serving Ideas: Good on beef, chicken, lamb, pork and veal.

Source: Fifty Ways to Cook Everything by Andrew Schloss and Ken Bookman
From: Paulette L Motzko posted to rec.food.cooking on Dec 2, 1995.
Adapted by Patti Vincent
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Dry Rubs: With Chili

Jamaican Jerk Seasoning Paste

2 ounces whole allspice
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1 tsp ground cinnamon
12 scallions (one bunch), cleaned and chopped
1 Scotch Bonnet (Habenero) pepper, stemmed (or 3 if seeded)
1/3 cup lemon juice
2 T olive oil
1 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp salt (optional)
1 T rum, or to taste (optional)

Crush the allspice in a blender or spice grinder. Leave it fairly course.
Combine all the remaining ingredients in a blender or food processor, and
process until well blended. Pour it in a jar and refrigerate until you are
ready to use it. This makes about a cup and it's pretty thick.

By Bruce Sherrod. Posted to the PaleoRecipe Mailing List, Aug. 2001
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Wet Jerk Rub

All the various wet jerk rubs, dry jerk rubs, and marinades have the same
core ingredients: scallions, thyme, Jamaican pimento (allspice), ginger,
Scotch bonnet peppers, black pepper, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Jamaican pimento
(allspice) is essential; it is more pungent than alspice from elsewhere.
The scallions used in Jamaica are more like baby red onions than the green
onions we find in our produce sections. The thyme is a very small leafed,
intensely flavored English thyme. These are the most critical herbal
flavors in jerk seasoning; the next most important flavor is Scotch bonnet
peppers.

Jamaicans all grow their own Scotch bonnets, or "country peppers" as they
are sometimes called. Scotch bonnets come in several varieties, all of
which have a similar "round taste," an intense heat with apricot or fruity
overtones. The best substitute for a Scotch bonnet is a fresh habanera
pepper.

1/2 cup fresh thyme leaves
2 bunches (about 15) green onions, finely chopped
1/4 cup ginger root, finely diced
3 Scotch bonnet peppers, stemmed and finely chopped
1/4 cup oil
5 garlic cloves, chopped
3 freshly ground bay leaves
2 teaspoons freshly ground allspice
1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1 tablespoon freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon freshly ground coriander
1 teaspoon freshly ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons salt
Juice of 1 lime

Combine all the ingredients into a thick, chunky paste. The mixture will
keep in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator for several months.

Most Jamaicans grind their spices by hand in a mortar and pestle. The whole
spices tend to retain more aromatic oils in them and therefore more of a
natural pungency. To save time, you can pulverize the spices in a spice
grinder or coffee mill, and then add them to the other ingredients.
Yields 4 cups

From: Traveling Jamaica With Knife, Fork & Spoon
      by Robb Walsh and Jay McCarthy
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Dry Spice Rub

1 cup salt
1 cup paprika
1 cup ground black pepper
1 cup cumin
1 cup Ancho chile powder

Mix all together well.

Posted to rec.food.recipes by Todd Matthews on April 28, 1997.
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Mild Mexican Jerky

1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp crushed oregano
1/4 tsp pepper
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp garlic powder

From: rec.food.preserving
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Middle Eastern Jerky

1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp turmeric
1/8 tsp pepper
1/8 tsp ground cumin
1--1/2 tsp coriander
1/4 tsp chili powder
1/4 tsp ground ginger

From: rec.food.preserving
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Fiesta Jerky

1 tsp salt
1 tsp onion powder
1/4 tsp pepper
1/4 tsp ground cumin
1 tbs chili powder
1 tsp garlic powder

From: rec.food.preserving
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Jamaican Jerk Marinade

1/4 cup whole allspice*
3 habaqero chiles**, seeded and chopped
10 green onions, chopped
1/2 cup chopped onion
4 cloves garlic, chopped
4 bay leaves, crushed
1 3-inch piece ginger, peeled and chopped
1/3 cup fresh thyme
1 teas freshly-ground nutmeg
1 teas freshly-ground cinnamon
1 teas salt (to taste)
1 tbls freshly-ground black pepper
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup lime juice.

Roast the allspice in a dry skillet until they are aromatic, about 2
minutes. Remove and crush them to a powder in a mortar or spice mill.
Add the powder and the remaining ingredients to a food processor and blend
to make a paste or sauce. Remove and store in a jar in the refrigerator; it
will keep for a month or more.

* In Jamaica, allspice is called pimento. So, if you see pimento in a
Caribbean recipe, don't reach for the sweet red peppers.

**10 on the heat scale of 1-10.

From: Paul Royko, Toronto, Canada
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Caribbean Jerk Rub

1 tbs onion powder (powder not salt)
1 tbs dried thyme
2 tsp dried allspice
2 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cloves

Blend all the above ingredients well. Rub over meat, poultry or seafood at
least 2 hours before grilling. Grill as usual.

Adapted from a Nancy Berry post in rec.food.cooking on May 30, 1995.
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Jerk Rub

1 onion, finely chopped
1/2 cup scallions, finely chopped
2 teas thyme leaves, fresh
1 teas salt
1 teas Jamaican pimento, (allspice)
1/4 teas nutmeg, ground
1/2 teas cinnamon, ground
4 to 6 hot peppers, finely ground
1 teas black pepper, fresh ground

Mix together all the ingredients to make a paste. A food processor fitted
with a steel blade is ideal for this. Store leftovers in the refrigerator
in a tightly closed jar for about a month.

From Im Chosen in rec.food.cooking on May 29, 1995.
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Chili Mixes

Basic Taco/Fajita Seasoning

1 tablespoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin (I prefer more ...)
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (or pinch of cayenne, to taste)

Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container.

By EdsGirlAngie. From: Food.com
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Homemade Taco Seasoning Mix

1 tbsp. chili powder (pure, not blend)
2 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. each ground cumin, garlic powder, paprika, powdered oregano
1/2 tsp. salt (Optional)

Mix all ingredients together in a small bowl. Makes 3 tablespoons of 
seasoning mix, which is equal in strength to a 1/4 ounce package of 
commercial seasoning mix.

Adpated from: Cooks.com
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Firehouse Hot Chili Powder

   6 tb Paprika
   2 tb Turmeric
   1 tb Dried chili peppers
   1 ts Cumin
   1 ts Oregano
 1/2 ts Cayenne
 1/2 ts Garlic powder
 1/2 ts Salt
 1/4 ts Ground cloves

Mix all ingredients and grind to a fine powder using a mortar and
pestle, or food processor or blender. Spice will keep 6 months or so
on the pantry shelf.

This powder is somewhat more pungent and fresher tasting than a
packaged brand, so use a bit less. Yield: 5.5 oz.

Source: Cheaper and Better Alternatives to Store Bought Goods, by Nancy 
        Birnes
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Homemade Chili Powder

   2    Dried ancho chilies
   2    Dried pasilla or mulato chilies
   4    Dried chipotle chilies
   2 ts Cumin seeds
   2 ts Dried oregano
 1/2 ts Ground cinnamon

Preheat oven to 300°F. Stem the chilies and roast them on a baking
sheet for 10 minutes, or until crisp. Let cool. Place the cumin seeds
in a dry skillet over medium heat and cook for 30 seconds, or until
fragrant and lightly toasted.

Break the chilies open and shake out the seeds. For a hotter chili
powder, leave the seeds in. Combine the chili pieces, cumin seeds,
and other spices and grind to a fine powder in a spice mill. Store in
an airtight container. Yield: 1 cup.

Note: This powder isn't particularly hot, but it's loaded with flavor.

Source: High-Flavor, Low-Fat Cooking by Steven Raichlen pg 164.
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Chili Powder

   2 tb Cumin seeds or 2 tb ground
   4    Dried hot chili peppers ground* or 2 tsp. crushed red pepper
   2 ts Dried oregano
   2 ts Garlic powder
   2 ts Onion powder
   1 ts Ground allspice
 1/8 ts Ground cloves

*If using dried hot chili peppers, remove the seeds before grinding
or the mixture will be too hot.

Combine all ingredients in a blender or electric grinder and grind
until mixture is a coarse powder. Use in recipes as directed. Yields
1/4 cup.

Source: Rodale's Basic Natural Foods Cookbook.
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Northeast African Rubs

East African Spice Mix No. 3

Add this to the long line of special spice mixtures that are responsible
for the characteristic flavors of certain cuisines. This particular mix is
modeled on an East African combination, the classic Ethiopian spice mix
known as berbere. Here we turn it into a wet spice by adding the tropical
staples ginger and orange juice. This spice mix is most appropriate for
soups (or wats, for you Ethiopian food fans out there) or as a rub, in
which guise I would try it with roast chicken or roast lamb.

1 tablespoon crushed cardamom seeds
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon ground nutmeg
1 tablespoon ground fenugreek
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 tablespoons ground coriander
2 tablespoons fennel seeds
1/4 cup paprika
1/4 cup cayenne pepper
2 tablespoons kosher salt
2 tablespoons freshly cracked black pepper
2 tablespoons virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons minced ginger
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 cup red wine
1/4 cup lemon or lime juice
1/2 cup orange juice

1. In a large saute pan, combine all the dry ingredients and saute over
medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes, shaking and stirring constantly. If the
mixture starts to smoke, remove from the heat immediately. Remove from the
pan and set aside.

2. Rinse and dry the saute pan, add the olive oil, and heat until hot but
not smoking. Add the ginger and garlic and saute, stirring frequently, for
1 minute. Add the wine, vinegar, and orange juice, bring to a boil, and
cook until reduced in volume by about half, 5 to 8 minutes. (This will take
longer if you are using a smaller saute pan.)

3. Remove from the heat, stir in the toasted dry spice mixture, and mix
well. This mixture will keep, covered and refrigerated, for up to 2 months.
Makes about 1 1/2 cups.

Adapted from: Big Flavors of the Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger and John 
              Willoughby
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Berbere Spice Blend: Western Version

6 tablespoons ground red pepper
2 tablespoons sweet paprika
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground dried mint

Mix together in a bowl. Heat a heavy skillet over low heat; add spices.
Toast lightly, stirring, until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
Cool. Makes 1/2 cup.

From: Orlando Sentinel
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Berbere, Hot Spice Mixture (Dry)

     2 ts Cumin seeds
     4    Cloves
   3/4 ts Cardamom seeds
   1/2 ts Black peppercorns
   1/4 ts Whole allspice
     1 ts Fenugreek seeds
   1/2 ts Coriander seeds
     8    Small dried red chiles
   1/2 ts Grated fresh gingerroot OR 1 teaspoon dried
   1/4 ts Tumeric
     1 ts Salt
 2 1/2 tb Sweet Hungarian paprika
   1/8 ts Cinnamon
   1/8 ts Ground cloves

In a small frying pan, on medium low heat, toast the cumin, cloves,
cardamom, peppercorns, allspice, fenugreek, and coriander for about 2
minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from the pan and cool for 5 minutes.

Discard the stems from the chiles. In a spice grinder or with a mortar and
pestle, finely grind together the toasted spices and the chiles. Mix in the
remaining ingredients.

Store Berbere refrigerated in a well sealed jar or a tightly closed plastic
bag.

From: SOAR: The Searchable Online Archive of Recipes
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Berbere Paste

14 Dried Piquin Chiles, Stems Removed
2 tb Ground Cayenne
2 tb Ground Paprika
4 Whole Cardamom Pods
2 ts Cumin Seeds
1/2 ts Fenugreek Seeds
1 sm Onion, Coarsely Chopped
4 Cloves Garlic
1 c Water
1/2 ts Ground Ginger
1/4 ts Ground Allspice
1/4 ts Ground Nutmeg
1/4 ts Ground Cloves
3 tb Oil

Berbere is the famous, or should we say, infamous, scorching Ethiopian hot
sauce, as well as the official language of Ethiopia. This highly spiced
sauce is used as an ingredient in a number of dishes, a coating when drying
meats, and as a side dish or condiment.

Toast the cardamom, cumin, peppercorns and fenugreek in a hot skillet,
shaking constantly, for a couple of minutes, until they start to crackle
and pop. Grind these spices to form a fine powder.

Combine the onions, garlic, and 1/2 cup water in a blender and puree until
smooth. Add the chiles and the spices and continue to blend. Slowly add the
remaining water and oil and blend until smooth.

Simmer the sauce for 15 minutes to blend the flavors annd thicken.

Serve sparingly as a condiment with grilled meats and poultry or add to
soups and stews.

From: SirCookalot.com
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Garam Masala: Traditional

Simple Dry Marsala

2 tablespoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons paprika
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 tablespoon crushed coriander seeds
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon ground ginger
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon dry mustard

Place all ingredients in a medium-size skillet and heat over medium heat,
shaking skillet until the first tiny wisp of smoke appears, 2 to 3 minutes.
Let cool, cover well, and store in a cool, dark place.
Makes a little over 1/2 cup.

From: Big Flavors of the Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby
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Sweet and Hot Masala No. 7

While working in my restaurant kitchen preparing daily specials, I often
make spice mixtures like this in small amounts to be used for a specific
dish. I call them masalas, which is what spice mixtures are called in
India, curry being a specific type of masala used mostly in the south. This
particular blend is strong on the sweeter flavors of cardamom, cinnamon,
and cloves. I use it as a dry rub on grilled chicken, but it can also be
used to add a little spice to a stew or soup just prior to serving. When
you are making it, the smell of the spices being heated adds a distinctive
touch of the dramatic and the exotic to your kitchen.

5 tablespoons whole cardamom seeds
1 stick cinnamon or 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
7 whole cloves or 1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 tablespoon dried chile pepper of your choice
3 tablespoons coriander seeds
1/4 cup cumin seeds
1 tablespoon ground turmeric
2 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
1 tablespoon whole white peppercorns (you may substitute black)

In a large saute pan, combine all the ingredients and cook over medium-low
heat, shaking frequently, until the mixture begins to take on a darker
color, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from the heat, allow to cool to room
temperature, then grind in a spice blender, coHee grinder, or blender. If
you keep this mixture tightly covered and store it in a cool, dark place,
it will stay potent for up to 6 weeks. Makes about 1 cup.

From: Big Flavors of the Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby
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Garam Masala

1 tablespoon cardamom seeds
1-2 inch stick of cinnamon
1 teaspoon black or regular cumin seeds
1 teaspoon whole cloves
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
1/4 of an average nutmeg

Place all ingredients in a clean electric coffee grinder or other spice
grinder. Grind for 30-40 seconds or until spices are finely ground.  Store
in a small jar with a tight fitting lid, away from heat and sunlight.
Makes 3 tablespoons.
She also lists a second version with sour pomegranite seeds in it.

This recipe is from Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cooking
Posted by kaleni@concentric.net to rec.food.recipes, Oct 12, 1998.
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Garam Masala

1 1/2   tsp     cardamon seeds
    5   tsp     coriander seeds
    1   tsp     cumin seeds
1 1/2   tsp     whole cloves
    2   tbsp    black peppercorns

Preheat oven to 450 F. In cake pan mix spices. Bake 12 minutes stiring once
or twice. Grind to powder when cooled.

Posted by srmcevoy@uwaterloo.ca to rec.food.recipes, Nov 8, 1998.
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Garam Masala

2 inch piece cinnamon stick (about 1/2 inch in diameter, broken into
                             smaller pieces)
6 allspice berries
1/4 tsp. freshing grated nutmeg
4 cloves

Whiz all ingredients together into a fine powder in an electric coffee
grinder, or grind to a powder using a mortar and pestle.  Makes about 1
tablespoon.

Graham Kerr gave this recipe in the Jan 96 issue of Vegetarian Times.
Posted by Dawn M Hyatt (wisc.edu) to rec.food.veg.cooking, Apr 4, 1997.
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Garam Masala

3 cinnamon sticks
2 tbsp cardamom seeds, removed from their pods
2 tbsp whole cloves
5 tbsp coriander seeds
4 tbsp black peppercorns

Crush the cinnamon sticks on a clean kitchen towel with a kitchen mallet
or the end of a rolling pin. Heat the spices in a 200 F oven for 15
minutes. Pulverize the mixture to a fine powder in an electric spice or
coffee grinder, or in a blender. Store the spices in an airtight jar or
self-sealing plastic bag. Yields about 1 1/2 cups.

Posted by Christine A Smith to rec.food.recipes, Mar 4, 1997
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Garam Masala

(the original recipe makes a huge amount of powder, so I broke it down into
parts or ratios and then converted it to teaspoon measures. I hope it
makes sense to you...)

4 tsp (16 parts) cumin
2 tsp (8 parts) fennel
2 tsp (8 parts) black cardamom
1 1/4 tsp (5 parts) green cardamom
1 1/4 tsp (5 parts) cloves
1 1/2 tsp (5 parts) cinnamon
1 1/4 tsp (5 parts) badiani khatai
1/4 (1 part) tsp mace
1/8 tsp (1/2 part) saffron
1/2 of a whole nutmeg (1 part)

Each spice is then individually roasted until fragrant (EXCEPT THE
SAFFRON!) and then ground together.

From: Time Life Foods of the World: The Cooking of India
Posted by Heather Bruhn to rec.food.cooking on Sep 8, 1996.
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Basic Garam-Masala

1 cup black cardamom pods, pods removed and discarded (i.e. 1 cup pods'
worth of seeds)
5 cinnamon sticks, broken into small pieces
1/4 cup black peppercorns
1/4 cup cumin seeds
2 Tablespoons whole cloves
1/4 whole nutmeg, grated

In a small heavy-bottomed pan, roast all of the ingredients over medium
heat, stirring constantly until the spices become a shade darker and
are very aromatic. Remove from the heat. Let cool a bit and then grind
to a fine powder in a small coffee or spice grinder. Store in an
airtight container. Makes 1 cup

From: Feast of India by Rani.
Posted by Nancy Wenlock to rec.food.cooking on April 23, 1996.
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Garam Masala (Curry Powder)

3/4 oz (20 g) brown cardamom seeds (illaichi)
3/4 oz (20 g) cinnamon (darchini)
1/4 oz (7 g) cloves (laung)
1/4 oz (7 g) black cumin seeds (kala zeera)
good-sized pinch mace (javatri)
good-sized pinch nutmeg (jaiphal)

Grind the ingredients together with the help of a mortar and pestle or in a
coffee grinder. Pass through a fine sieve and store in an air-tight bottle.
Recipe for 2 ozs (60 g).

From: Indian Cookery by Mrs. Balbir Singh, pub 1973.
The author is from Punjab.
Posted by Sharon Raghavachary to rec.food.cooking on April 23, 1996.
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Traditional Garam Masala

4 Tblsp coriander seeds
2 Tblsp cumin seeds
1 Tblsp whole black peppercorns
2 tsp cardamom seeds (measure after roasting and removing pods)
4 3" cinnamon sticks
1 tsp whole cloves
1 whole nutmeg

In a small dry pan, roast separately, the coriander, cumin, peppercorns,
cardamom pods, cinnamon and cloves. As each one starts to smell fragrant,
turn onto a plate and leave to cool. The roasting brings out the flavours
and makes the spices brittle and easier to grind to a powder.
Peel the cardamoms, discarding pods and using only seeds.
Put all the spices into an electric blender, coffee grinder, and blend to
a fine powder. Finely grate the nutmeg and mix through.
Store in a glass jar with a tight fitting lid, making sure to keep it
away from heat and light.
You can also make this the quick way by using pre-ground spices, but you
must/should still roast them under just enough heat to bring out the
fragrance.

From: Philippa Jane Wightman in rec.food.cooking on Apr 23, 1996.
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Garam Masala

3 T (about 20) black or 2 T (about 75) green cardamom pods
3 cinnamon sticks, 3 inches long
1 T whole cloves
1/4 cup black peppercorns
1/2 cup cumin seeds
1/2 cup Coriander seeds

Break open cardamom pods, remove seeds, and reserve. Discard skin. Crush
cinnamon with kitchen mallet or rollin pin to break into small pieces.
Combine all spices and roast in a dry frying pan until the start to turn
color and give off their fragrance. This will take about 5 minutes. Keep
moving the spices around to keep them from burning. Grind spices. Store in
air tight container.

From: Julie Sahini's Classic Indian Cooking
Posted by Mary f. in rec.food.cooking on Jan 22, 1996.
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Garam Masala

2 3-in. cinnamon sticks
1/4 c coriander seeds
2 T cumin seeds
2 T black peppercorns
2 t cardamom seeds
2 t whole cloves
1 t fennel seeds

Crush cinnamon into small pieces, place all spices on a baking tray and
heat in a 200 deg (F) oven for 30 min. Stir spices once or twice during
baking. Remove from oven, cool briefly. Pulverize in batches in
coffee/spice grinder, or at once in blender. Store in cool dark place, use
within three months.

From: Sundays at Moosewood Restaurant (halved)
Posted by David Ratigan to rec.food.cooking on May 11, 1996.
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Garam Masala (mild)

  3 ounce coriander seeds
1/4 teaspoon mace
  1 ounce cumin seeds
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 ounce fenugreek seeds
  1 ounce cinnamon
  1 ounce cloves
  1 ounce black peppercorns
  2 ounce cardamom seeds (brown are best)

Roast coriander seeds, cumin, and fenugreek seeds separately for a
few minutes until their rich aroma is given off. Combine with all other
ingredients and grind. Before grinding, a heavy rolling pin may be used to
crush the spices enclosed in an envelope of foil.
Pass the mixture through a sieve and store in an airtight jar.
Note: Roasting the ingredients separately is important since each gives off
its characteristic aroma at a different time.

Compiled by Kathleen M. Weber in 1993.
Posted by Jai Maharaj to rec.food.veg, et. al. on Dec 4, 1995.
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Garam Masala No. 3038

     1 small     Nutmeg, Whole
 1 1/2 Tbls      Cardamom, Green Pods
     4 1 Inch    Cinnamon Sticks
     1 Tbls      Whole Cloves
     1 tsp       Peppercorns
     1 tsp       Cumin Seeds

NOTES: All the ingredients MUST be FRESH. DO NOT use bleached white
cardamom pods. Grind the cardamom pods along with the spice. You may use a
coffee grinder (but not one which has been used to grind coffee) or a spice
grinder. Do NOT use one of the coffee grinders which slices (chops) rather
than grinds.

Crush the nutmeg coarsely using a mortar and pestle. Combine with the
remaining ingredients. Place in the feed container of the grinder. Grind
very fine. Store in an airtight container. May be frozen.

Posted by Joel Ehrlich to rec.food.cooking on Aug 11, 1995.
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Garam Masala

Garam Masala translates as "warm" or "hot" and masala means "spice
blend." In India, this mix varies from region to region, and household to
household. It can include anywhere from 3 to 12 different spices.

4  tablespoons coriander seeds
4  teaspoons cumin seeds
1  teaspoon fennel seeds
Seed from 20 green cardamom pods
2  teaspoons black peppercorns
1  teaspoon whole cloves
2-inch cinnamon stick, broken into pieces
10 bay leaves, crushed
1/2   teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Combine all seeds, the peppercorns, cloves, cinnamon and bay leaves in a
heavy 10-inch frying pan. Toast over medium heat until the mixture is
aromatic and the seeds become reddish-brown, about 5 minutes. Add the
nutmeg and toast 1 minute. Cool slightly.
Transfer to a spice grinder and grind to a fine powder.
Store in an airtight glass jar. Will keep up to 3 months at cool room
teperature, or up to 6 months in the refrigerator.
Yields about 1/2 cup.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle (Food Section)
Posted by Joe Shaw to rec.food.cooking on May 9, 1995.
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Spice Recipes: Garam Masala: Regional

Garam Masala (as used by Kashmiri chefs)

1/4 oz (7 g) black cumin seeds (kala zeera)
1 oz (28 g) brown cardamoms (illaichi)
1/4 oz (7 g) black pepper (kali mirch)
1/4 oz (7 g) cinnamon (darchini)
1/4 oz (7 g) cloves (laung)
3 blades mace (javatri)
1/8 of a nutmeg (jaiphal)

Grind these spices together, sieve and store in an air-tight bottle.

From: Indian Cookery by Mrs. Balbir Singh, pub 1973.
The author is from Punjab.
Posted by Sharon Raghavachary to rec.food.cooking on Apr 23, 1996.
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Mughal Garam Masala

1/2 cup (about 60) black or 1/3 cup (about 200) green cardamom pods
2 Cinammon sticks, 3 inches long
1 T whole cloves
1 T black peppercorns
1 1/2 t grated nutmeg (optional)

Remove seed from cardamom pods, break up cinammon sticks and grind all
together in a spice grinder (you'll probably have to do it in batches if
you use a little coffee grinder). Note: recipe may be cut in half. Makes
3/4 cup

From: Mary f. in rec.food.cooking on April 22, 1996.
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Garam Masala (Northern India) No. 3040

   5 Pods      Cardamom
   3 3" Sticks Cinnamon
 1/3 Cup       Whole Cumin
   8           Whole Cloves
 1/4 Cup       Whole Coriander
 1/2 Cup       Whole Black Pepper

Remove the small black seeds from the cardamom pods. Discard the cardamom
husks. Combine the cardamom seeds with the remaining ingredients in a spice
grinder. NOTE: You may crush them using a mortar and pestle if you wish.
Store in a tightly covered glass jar. May be frozen.

Posted by Joel Ehrlich to rec.food.cooking on Aug 11, 1995.
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Punjabi-Style Garam Masala

 2 1/2   Tb      Green cardamom pods
 5       Tb      Coriander seeds
 3               Blades of mace
 2       Tb      Black peppercorns
 2               Cinnamon sticks, 3" long
   1/4   Ts      Ground ginger
 4       Tb      Cumin seeds
   1/4   Ts      Ajowan seeds
         Ts      Ground mace
 1 1/2   Tb      Whole cloves
 1               Bay leaf
 1       Tb      Ground nutmeg

A little of this warm, spicy blend goes a long way. Coming from North
India, where meat is eaten more frequently than in the South, it is the
kind of masala that's popular as an accompaniment for almost any meat dish,
as a condiment or in the sauce. Grind toasted ingredients with mace,
peppercorns, cloves, cinnamon, and bay leaf, and mix well with the other
ground ingredients.

Source: Lord Krishna's Cuisine: The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking by 
        Yamuna Devi.
Format by sweber@ix.netcom.com (Sharon Raghavachary)
Posted by amanda@gate.net to rec.food.cooking on June 20, 1998.
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Garam Masala - Punjabi Style No. 3077

 2 1/2 Tbls    Green Cardamom Pods
 1 1/2 Tbls    Whole Cloves
     4 Tbls    Cumin Seeds
     2 3"      Cinnamon Sticks
     5 Tbls    Coriander Seeds
     1         Bay Leaf
   1/4 tsp     Ajowan Seeds
   1/4 tsp     Ginger, Ground
   1/4 tsp     Mace, Ground
     1 Tbls    Nutmeg, Ground
     2 Tbls    Black Peppercorns

Toast the green cardamom pods, cumin seeds, coriander seeds and ajowan
seeds in a wide, heavy bottomed pan, stirring occasionally until they brown
and begin to release their fragrance (5-7 minutes). Place in a mortar,
spice grinder or blender. Add the peppercorns, cloves, cinnamon sticks and
bay leaf. Grind to a fine powder. Add the mace, ginger and nutmeg. Mix
thoroughly. Place in a glass container. Cover tightly.

Posted by Joel Ehrlich to rec.food.cooking on Aug 11, 1995.
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Mixes for Fruit

Apple Pie Spice

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/8 tsp ground allspice
1/8 tsp ground cardamom

Combine all ingredients. If you make extra, store in an airtight container.

From: About.com: Southern Food
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Mixes for Boiling and Pickling

Crab-Boil Spices

1/4 cup pickling spices or at Amazon
2 tablespoons mustard seeds
2 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
1 tablespoon celery seeds
2 tablespoons dried hot red pepper flakes
2 teaspoons ground ginger
5 bay leaves
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1 tablespoon minced dried chives
1/4 cup sea salt

In a food processor combine all ingredients and pulse until mixture forms a
coarse powder. Crab-boil spices keep in a well-sealed container for several
months in a cool, dark place.

by Jessica B. Harris. In Gourmet, February 1995. Found at epicurious
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Pickling Spice

2 tablespoons mustard seeds
2 tablespoons whole allspice
2 teaspoons coriander seeds
2 teaspoons whole cloves
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes
1 bay leaf, crumbled
1 cinnamon stick (2 inches)

Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight jar or container.

Comment: Way too much ginger and cloves. Suggest leaving both out and 
adding celery seed.

By lauralie41. From: Food.com
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Wicklewood's Pickling Spice Mix

4 dried bay leaves, crumbled
2 cinnamon sticks, broken
2 teaspoons black peppercorns
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
1 teaspoon whole cloves
1 teaspoon whole allspice
1 teaspoon juniper berries
1 teaspoon crumbled whole mace
1 teaspoon dill seed
1 teaspoon dried ginger, crushed
2 teaspoons of small dried red chilli

Mix together all the ingredients.
Store in a small, airtight jar up to 2 months.

Note: You can make these into little spice bundles by placing 1 Tablespoon
of mix onto a 2" square piece of muslin, pull up all edges and tie with a
piece of string.

By WicklewoodWench. From: Food.com
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WicklewoodWench

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