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Paleo/Primal Sausage Making Recipes

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Sausage Defined

Sausage means ground pork or a mixture of 1/3 ground pork and 2/3 any other
kind of meat. Classic sausage is made of pork trimmings, 1/3 fat to 2/3
lean. Or of ground beef and pork mixed which is bologna, or of lamb,
mutton, or goat bound with 1/3 pork to help hold it together and improve
flavor. It can also be made of part liver which gives you liver sausage.

From Old Fashioned Recipe Book by Carla Emery.
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Boudin Blanc (Sausage Making)

    3 ea 3ft hog sausage casing
    3 lb Boneless lean pork
    4 c  Coarsely chopped onions
    1 md Bay leaf, crumbled
    6    Whole black peppercorns
    5 ts Salt
    1 c  Green pepper, coarse chop
    1 c  Parsley, coarse chop
  1/2 c  Green onions, coarse chop
    1 tb Finely chopped garlic
2 1/2 c  Freshly cooked white rice
    1 tb Dried sage leaves
2 1/2 ts Cayenne
  1/2 ts Fresh ground black pepper

Boudin is the French term for the blood sausage, or "pudding," made with
the blood of the pig. Boudin blanc is a white sausage made with pork but no
blood. This Louisiana version adds rice and is even whiter.

Makes 3 sausages, each about 30 inches long.

Trim off excess fat from pork and cut into 1 1/2 inch chunks.

Place the sausage casing in a bowl. Pour in enough warm water to cover it
and soak for 2 - 3 hours, until it is soft and pliable.

Meanwhile, put the pork in a heavy 4-5 quart casserole and add enough water
to cover it by 1 inch. Bring to a boil over high heat and skim off the foam
and scum that rise to the surface. Add 2 cups of onion, the bayleaf,
peppercorns and 1 tsp salt. Reduce heat to low and simmer, partially
covered, for 1 1/2 hours.

With a slotted spoon, transfer the chunks of pork to a plate. Put the pork,
the remaining 2 cups of onions, the green pepper,
parsley, green onions and garlic through the medium blade of a food grinder
and place the mixture in a  deep bowl. Add the rice, sage, cayenne and
black  pepper and the remaining 4 tsp of salt. Knead vigourously with both
hands, then  beat with a wooden spoon until the mixture is smooth and
fluffy. Taste for seasoning.

To make each sausage, tie a knot 3 inches from one end of a length of the
casing. Fit the open end over the funnel (or "horn") on the sausage making
attachment of a meat grinder. Then ease the rest of the casing onto the
funnel, squeezing it up like the folds of an accordion.

Spoon the meat mixture into the mouth of the grinder and, with a wooden
pestle, push it through into the casing. As you fill it, the casing will
inflate and gradually ease away from the funnel in a ropelike coil. Fill
the casing to within an inch or so fo the funnel end but do not try to
stuff it too tightly, or it may burst. Slip the casing off the funnel and
knot the open end. You may cook the sausages immediately or refrigerate
them safely for five or six days.

Before cooking a sausage, prick the casing in five or six places with a
skewer or the point of a small sharp knife. Melt 2 Tbsp of butter with
1 Tblsp of oil in a heavy 12 inch skillet set over moderate heat. When the
foam begins to subside, place the sausage in the skillet, coiling it in
concentric circles. Turning the sausage with tongs, cook uncovered for
about 10 minutes, or until it is brown on both sides.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Boudin (Sausage Making)

   1 lb Hog or beef blood (1 pint)
 1/2 lb Hog fat
 1/4 ts Salt
 1/4 ts Pepper
 1/2 ts Cayenne
 1/2    Garlic clove
   2    Onions

Mince the onions fine and fry them slightly in a small  piece of the hog
fat. Add the minced garlic. Hash and mince the remaining fat very fine and
mix it thoroughly with the beef blood. Mix the onions, spices and herbs.
When all mixed take the prepared casings or entrails and fill with the
mixture, being careful to tie the casing at the further end before
attempting to fill. Then tie the other end making the sausage into strings
of about two feet. Wash them thoroughly on the outside after filling and
then tie again in spaces of about three inches or less in length, being
careful not to make too long. Place them to cook in a pot of tepid water
never letting them boil as that would curdle the blood. Let them remain on
the slow fire till you can prick the sausage with a needle and no blood
will exude. Then take them out, let them dry and cool

Boudins are always fried in boiling lard. Some broil them, however.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Bratwurst (Sausage Making)

    3    Ft small hog casings (1-1/2-inch diameter)
1 1/2 lb Lean pork butt, cubed
    1 lb Veal, cubed
  1/2 lb Pork fat, cubed
  1/4 ts Ground allspice
  1/2 ts Crushed caraway seeds
  1/2 ts Dried marjoram
    1 ts Fresh ground white pepper
    1 ts Salt, or to taste

1. Prepare the casings.

2. Grind the pork, veal, and pork fat separately through the fine blade
of the grinder.

3. Mix the ground meats and grind again.

4. Add the remaining ingredients to the meat mixture and mix thoroughly.

5. Stuff the mixture into the casings and twist off into four- or
five-inch lengths.

6. Refrigerate for up to two days. The bratwurst can be pan fired or
grilled over charcoal.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Paleo Breakfast Sausage Patties

1 Beaten Egg
1/3 Cup Finely Chopped Onion
1/4 Cup finely snipped dried or 1/2 cup fresh chopped apples (Optional, may
   be omitted)
2 Tbsp. Parsley flakes or snipped fresh parsley
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp ground sage
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/8 tsp red cayenne pepper (this is for mild sausage, add more if you like
it hot)
1/2 lb ground pork (can also substitute ground beef, turkey, or chicken)

Combine all ingredients in large bowl and mix well. Form into patties and
grill or pan fry. This tastes almost exactly like Jimmy Dean Sage Sausage
without the non-paleo preservatives and additives.
Adapted from Recipe that comes with manual to George Foreman grill

Above recipe adapted to make Scotch Eggs (1 dozen)
2 beaten eggs
1 onion finely chopped
1 apple finely chopped ( optional, may be omitted)
1 stalk of fresh parsley chopped or equal amount parsley flakes
3 tsp sea salt
3 tsp ground sage
1 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg [or allspice]
1 1/2 tsp black pepper
3/4 teaspoon red cayenne pepper ( this is for mild sausage, add more if you
like it hot)
3 1bs. ground pork (can also substitute/mix ground beef, turkey, or chicken)
1 dozen eggs

Combine all ingredients in large bowl and mix well. Hard boil 1 dozen eggs,
cool, and peel off shells. Form 12 equally sized sausage patties from
sausage mixture. Wrap eggs in patties forming them around the eggs evenly.
Place on a cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 25 to 35 minutes until
done (look for browning of the sausage. These are delicious and make an
excellent quick breakfast or snack during the busy week, and are also good
cold. The juice from the sausage penetrates into the yoke giving it a great
flavor.

Adapted from recipe by TygerLile available at http://www.atkinsfriends.com
By Sean Townsend. Posted to the PaleoRecipe Mailing List, April 2001
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Breakfast Sausage

Amount   Measure    Ingredient         Preparation Method
  1      lb lean     pork and veal        cubed
  1/2    lb clean    pork fatback         cut into small cubes
         large dash  Hickory Smoked Salt
  1      tsp         sage
         lots        black pepper
                     maple syrup, optional

The secret to good sausage is to keep everything cold, including the meat
grinder.

Mix all ingredients together in a bowl which is sitting in a bowl of ice.
Grind together on the coarsest setting, twice. Make a patty and fry it to
taste, then reseason quickly. Put away immediately in a cool place.

If you like sausage sweet, add some maple syrup. If you like it really
hot, add some red pepper.

Posted by Sheri McRae to rec.food.recipes on Nov 29, 1995.
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Breakfast or Country Sausage

10 pounds pork shoulder
4 Tb. salt
1 1/2 Tb. white pepper
2 1/2 Tb. sage
1 Tb. nutmeg
1 Tb. thyme
1 1/2 tsp. ginger
1/2 Tb. cayenne pepper
2 Cups ice water

Trim the fat off the pork shoulder, if you like lean sausage, or leave it
on if you like more flavor. Always make certain that your meat is free of
bone and glands. Limpy likes the 1/8" grinding plate, and recommends
grinding the meat only once. To the ground meat, mix in the dry spices
first. Then add the ice water. Mix thoroughly. Bulk sausage is easily made
into patties, or you can use 22-24mm lamb casings for the challenge of
making link sausage. They usually cost between $25.00 - $35.00 per hank
(bundle), and can stuff approximately 55 Lbs. of meat. Wrap the finished
product in freezer paper for long term storage, or fry some up right now
for a real treat!

From: Panhead. posted to many newsgroups
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Country Sausage (a.k.a. Breakfast Sausage)

The way I have been making it lately is to use pork butt roast, cutting
out the bone and about half of the fat. I cube the meat, salt it, pepper
it with coarse ground pepper, and put sage on it. I mix up this and give
it a grind. After grinding, I let it sit to meld the flavours, mix it up
again, and either put it into patties, or stuff casings with it. Either
way, it is tasty. I almost forgot, someone recommended savory as well,
and I will try that the next time I find time to make sossaj.

From: Eddie Van Huffel in rec.food.cooking on Oct 19, 1996.
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Cabbage Sausage

10 lb coarsely ground pork shoulder
10 lb coarsely ground cabbage
2-3 lb onion
Paprika to colour
Salt and pepper to taste

Mix well and stuff into casings. Tie off at 4" intervals.
Can be frozen. Can add 1 hot pepper.
Traditionally served as sandwiches on Christmas Eve.

From: Dan Aleksandrowicz's parents. Forum: rec.food.recipes, Dec 2, 1997.
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Chaurice (Cajun Pork Sausage Making)

    3    Yd small sausage casing (about 1 inch wide)
    4 lb Lean fresh pork
    2 lb Fresh pork fat
    2 c  Very finely chopped onion
    4 ts Very finely minced garlic
    1 ts Cayenne
    1 ts Chili powder
    1 ts Crushed red pepper pods
2 2/3 tb Salt
    2 ts Fresh ground black pepper
    2 ts Dried thyme
    5 tb Fine minced fresh parsley
    3    Whole bay leaves, crushed vey fine
  1/2 ts Allspice

This creole pork sausage is a local favorite dating well back into the 19th
century. Its firm texture and hearty, spicy flavor make it an excellent
accompaniment to red or white beans and rice or grilled as a breakfast
sausage.

Prepare sausage casings by soaking them in cold water for an hour, then
running cold water through them. Cut off a 3 yard length. Repack the rest
and refrigerate for later use.

Cut the pork and fat into small pieces with a sharp knife. Mix together and
run once through the coarse blade of the meat grinder, placing a large bowl
in  front of the grinder to catch the meat. Add seasonings and mix
vigorously with a wooden spoon or large stiff wire whisk until stuffing is
fluffy and very smooth.

Cut casing into 16 inch lengths and stuff.

To cook, place in a large heavy skillet or saute pan with about 1/4 inch
cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat, cover the pan, then reduce
heat to low and cook for about 15 minutes. Uncover, raise heat to medium
and cook until sausage is well browned on all sides, about 10 minutes
longer, turning frequently with tongs. Drain on paper towels. Allow one
chaurice per person.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Chaurice(2) (Cajun Pork Sausage Making)

    2 lb Boneless pork shoulder, cut in cubes or strips
  3/4 lb Chilled pork fat, cut in cubes or stripes
    1 lg Onion, chopped coarsely
    2    Cloves garlic, fine chopped
1 1/2 ts Crushed dried red hot pepper
1 1/2 ts Salt
    1 ts Fresh ground black pepper
    1 ts Ground red pepper (cayenne)
    1 ts Crumbled leaf thyme
  1/2 ts Ground allspice

Heat sausage casings soaked and rinsed. (med. grind) grind pork and pork
fat and place in large mixing bowl. Add onion, garlic, parsley, red pepper,
salt, and pepper, cayenne, thyme, and allspice. Mix well. Refrigerate for
at least 12 hours stirring once or twice to allow flavor to develop. Grind
mixture and stuff in hog casings, twist or tie off in 4 to 5 inch links.

COOK: the sausage immediately or refrigerate them for up to 4-5 days or
freeze for later.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Chaurice(3) (Cajun Pork Sausages Making)

1 1/2 lb Lean pork, trim of fat
  2/3 lb Fatback or hardest pork fat avail
    1 c  Finely chopped onion
  1/2 c  Finely chopped parsley
1 1/2 tb Finely minced garlic
    2 tb Hot red chiles, fine chop
         -or 1 ts dried red pepper
2 1/2 ts Cayenne pepper
    2 ts Dried thyme
  1/2 ts Allspice
    1 tb Salt, if desired
    6    Prepared sausage casings

Grind the pork and pork fat using a meat grinder. Add the onion, parsley
and spices. Test the mixture by making a small patty and cooking it. 
Adjust seasonings if need be. Put the mixture through the meat grinder
a second time. Stuff the sausage casing. When ready to cook, prick the
sausages all over with a fork to prevent bursting. Fry in a little oil.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Chaurice(4) (Creole Pork Sausage Making)

    7 lb Fresh pork
    2 lg Onions, chopped
    1    Clove garlic, crushed
    2 tb Salt
    2 ts Fresh ground black pepper
    1 ts Crushed chili pepper
  1/2 ts Paprika
  1/2 ts Cayenne pepper
    3    Sprigs parsley, chopped
  1/2 ts Allspice
  1/4 ts Powdered bay leaf
    5    Yd sausage casing

  Grind the pork using the coarse knife of a meat
  grinder. Add the onions and the garlic and regrind.
  Add the seasonings and mix thoroughly.

Remove the cutting blades from the grinder and attach the sausage stuffer.
Attach casing as in basic sausage recipe. Refeed the mixture into grinder
and through the sausage stuffer.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Chaurice(5) Hot (Cajun Pork Sausage Making)

    1    Jalapeno, stem/seed, mince
  1/2 ts Cayenne powder
  1/4 ts Crushed red chile
1 1/2 lb Ground pork
  1/2 c  Finely chopped onion
    1    Clove garlic, minced
  1/2 ts Ground black pepper
    1 tb Fresh parsley, minced
  1/2 ts Salt
    1 sm Minced thyme sprig
         -or 1/4 tsp. dried
    1 sm Bay leaf, crumbled
       Pn allspice
       Pn mace

Combine all ingredients and mix well. Stuff casings and form any length
links desired. Refrigerate up to 3 days for flavors to blend. Cook the
sausages in your preferred manner and serve them as a spicy accompaniment
to pinto beans and corn bread or with a heap of steaming grits. This
Southern favorite can be grilled as a breakfast or dinner sausage and is
the classic sausage of Jambalaya.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Georgian Sausage (Kupati)

1 pound pork butt
1/2 pound hard fatback (or salt pork, blanched for 15 minutes and chilled)
2 large garlic cloves, peeled
1 teaspoon dried summer savory
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup tkemali sauce

Grind together medium-fine the pork butt, fatback, and garlic. Thoroughly
work in the spices with your hands, then stir in the tkemali sauce. 
Optionally (and to be authentic) stuff the mixture into casings to make 
sausages about 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Tie the casings at 8-inch 
intervals, tying off each link twice so that they can be cut apart. 
Separate the links and shape into horseshoes or coils. Or simply shape 
into patties. Either grill or fry the kupati in a skillet. Serves 4.

From: The Georgian Feast: The Vibrant Culture and Savory Food of the 
      Republic of Georgia by Darra Goldstein.
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Herbed Sausage

 1      pound           ground pork
 1 1/4  teaspoons       salt
 1 1/4  teaspoons       sage
 1/8    teaspoon        allspice

Season as above or to taste. Mix all ingredients. Chill overnight.
Form into patties, cook in fry pan until done.

Recipe By: Gourmet Magazine
From: Terry Taylor in rec.food.recipes on Feb 10, 1998.
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Italian Sausage

2 lbs coarsely ground pork shoulder
2 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
2 Tbsp fennel seed
1/2 can water
1-2 tsp ground hot pepper seeds

Soak fennel seed in water for 10 minutes or more.
Mix fennel and water with pork. Mix in spices and stuff into casings.
Tie off at 4" intervals.

From: Dan Aleksandrowicz's parents. Forum: rec.food.recipes, Dec 2, 1997.
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Italian Sausage

 5      pounds          ground pork
 1      tablespoon      coriander seed
 1      tablespoon      parsley flakes
 2      tablespoons     fennel seed
 2      large cloves    garlic, -- minced
 1      tablespoon      salt
 1 1/2  teaspoons       fresh ground pepper

Blend seeds and parsley flakes in blender until fine. Mix all
ingredients, chill over night. Crumble or shape into patties, cook in
fry pan until done.

Source: Gourmet Magazine
From: Terry Taylor in rec.food.recipes on Feb 10, 1998.
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Italian Sausage (Mild)

 5      pounds        Pork butt -- ground
 5      teaspoons     Salt
 5      teaspoons     Fennel seed
 1 1/2  teaspoons     Crushed hot pepper
 1 1/2  teaspoons     Pepper -- black
 1      cup           Water

Combine all ingredients, mix well and stuff into hog casing or make
patties. To cook, fry or bake.

Source: The Sausage Making Cookbook, by Jerry Predika
From: Collection of Clarence Fontish
Posted by Art Poe to rec.food.recipes on Jan 10, 1996.
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Italian Sausage

8 lb Pork shoulder
2 tsp Salt
1 tsp Black pepper
4 tsp Fennel seeds
4 tsp Oregano
1 tsp Garlic powder

Cut the pork into 1 1/2" cubes. Sprinkle combined seasoning on
pork and toss to distribute. Grind. Shape sausage into patties.

From: Karl E. Moser (KE3NF) in rec.food.recipes on Nov 14, 1998.
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Italian Sausage

Mix together:
 1 pound ground pork
 1 medium onion, finely chopped
 1 small garlic clove, crushed

Combine and mix into pork mixture:
 1/2 tablespoon salt
 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed
 1/4 teaspoon paprika
 1/8 teaspoon ground thyme
 1/8 teaspoon (or more) cayenne pepper

Shape into patties, meatballs, or stuff into casings.

Found on the Cookbook USA CD.
Posted by Betsy Couch to rec.food.recipes on Jan 5, 1996.
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Liver Sausage

Boil five pounds pork liver for one hour. Discard broth. Cover five pounds
lean pork and five pounds pork skin with water. Add 3 bay leaves, 6 whole
cloves, and 1 onion. Boil for 2 hours. Skim the fat from the broth. Remove
the meat and cool the broth. Grind the liver and the meat. Add salt,
pepper, and garlic, salt to taste. Add enough of the broth to moisten the
mixture well. Stuff into casings and boil one hour. Keep in refrigerator or
freezer. This recipe only makes enough to stuff about six casings. Don't
smoke liver sausage.

From: Old Fashioned Recipe Book by Carla Emery.
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Plain Sausage

Grind up pork trimmings.  Season with salt, pepper, sage, and optional red
pepper.

From: Old Fashioned Recipe Book by Carla Emery.
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Polish Sausage

6 lb coarsely ground pork shoulder
3 Tbsp and 1 tsp salt
3 tsp Marjoram
4 cloves garlic
1 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
2 1/2 can water

Mix well and stuff into casings.
Tie off at 4" intervals. Can be frozen.

From: Dan Aleksandrowicz's parents. Forum: rec.food.recipes, Dec 2, 1997.
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Polish Sausage

    4 lb Pork butt
    1 lb Beef stew meat
    2 T  Pepper, black; coarse ground
    1 T  Marjoram leaves
    8    Garlic clove; pressed
  1/4 ts Allspice
3 1/2 ts Salt
    1 c  Water

Grind pork and beef very coarsely. Combine all ingredients, mix well
and stuff into hog casing or make patties.

Source: The Sausage Making Cookbook, by Jerry Predika
From: Collection of Clarence Fontish
Posted by Sam Waring to rec.food.recipes on Sep 4, 1995.
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Serbian Cevapcici

1 1/2 pounds ground pork
1 pound lean ground beef
1/2 pound ground lamb
1 egg white
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons ground black pepper
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon paprika

Preheat a grill for medium-low heat.

In a large bowl, combine the ground pork, ground beef, ground lamb and egg
white. Add the garlic, salt, baking soda, black pepper, cayenne pepper and
paprika. Mix well using your hands, and form into finger length sausages
about 3/4 inch thick.

Lightly oil the grilling surface. Grill sausages until cooked through,
turning as needed, about 30 minutes.

By: AMERICANBRUNETTE. From: AllRecipes
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Sicilian-Style Hot Or Sweet Sausage

5 Feet med. (2-in diameter) casing
4 1/2 lb Lean pork butt, cubed
1/2 lb Pork fat, cubed
2 1/2 Tbsp Salt, or to taste
3 tsp Freshly coarse ground black
3 tsp Fennel seed
Crushed red pepper to taste
2 Cloves garlic, finely minced
1 tsp Anise seed (optional)

Prepare the casings. Grind the meat and fat together through the coarse
disk. Mix the remaining ingredients together with the meat and fat. Stuff
the mixture into casings and twist off into three or four-inch links.
Refrigerate and use within three days or freeze.

Posted by Karl E. Moser (KE3NF) to rec.food.recipes on Nov 22, 1998.
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Venison Sausage from Fred Goslin

8 1/4 lb Venison [ground]
3 1/4 lb Bacon [ground]
1 1/2 Tbsp Salt
1 1/2 Tbsp Pepper
1 1/2 Tbsp Poultry seasoning
  1/2 tsp Allspice
  1/2 tsp Sage
  1/2 tsp Nutmeg
    1 cup  Water

Combine all of the ingredients, mixing well. 2) Shape into
patties and fry in a skillet 'til brown on both sides. (sausage will
be slightly pink on the inside) *or* It may also be stuffed in
casings and boiled...

Source: Randy L. Riley, Carthage NY. from Bill Saiff's Rod & Reel:
Recipes for Hookin' & Cookin' re-typed with permission by Fred Goslin
on Cyberealm BBS, home of KOOKNET in Watertown NY (315) 786-1120
From: the recipe collection of Fred Towner
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Venison Hard Salami

5 lb venison without suet/fats OR hamburger
5 tsp tender quick salt
2 1/2 tsp coarse black pepper
2 1/2 tsp garlic salt
1 tsp hickory smoked salt/ liquid flavoring

Mix all ingredients in a pan. Keep refrigerated and covered. Mix well once
a day for 3 days. On 4th day form in firm compact rolls and place on
broiler pan. Bake 4 hours at  180 degrees. Turn rolls 3 times during
baking. Salami may be cooked longer it you wish it to be firmer.

From: the recipe collection of Fred Towner
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Deer Sausage I

10 lb deer meat, lean
10 lb pork, fresh, lean
3 oz water
1 oz pepper, black
3/4 oz ginger, ground
1 1/4 oz nutmeg
1/2 oz allspice
1/2 oz paprika
2 tsp garlic powder
12 oz salt
1/2 lb dried milk
2 1/2 tsp liquid smoke

Grind together the two meats, mix thoroughly. Add measured water. Mix
spices thoroughly and mix well into meat mixture. If sausage is to be
smoked, omit the liquid smoke. You may stuff sausage into casings, making
6-8" links, or make into patties for freezing.
To cook, place in a frying pan with a cover, adding water to the 1/3 mark
on the sausage. Boil for 15 minutes covered, then remove. Drain most of
the fat from the pan; replace sausage and brown. Make gravy in pan after
sausage done.

From: the recipe collection of Fred Towner
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Deer Sausage Recipe

I got this from one of the Frugal Gourmet TV shows-- he made it with pork.
I've tried it with antelope meat or deer meat. Excellent every time!!

Seasonings for 4 pounds ground meat (I get it ground with 2/3 game
scraps 1/3 pork suet)

1 Tbls fennel seed, freshly ground- (I just put all dry spices in the
   blender and whirl for a while)
3 Bay leaves, crushed (I've left this out before, and it's still good)
3-4 Tbls minced parsley, fresh or dried
5 cloves fresh garlic minced
1/2 Tbls red pepper flakes (more or less depending on taste)
3 teas salt
3 Tbls freshly ground black pepper

Mix all together and refrigerate 24 hours before cooking so that flavors
will blend. May use as bulk sausage or, if you happen to have a sausage
casing machine, you could make links (I haven't been that ambitious)

We like to use this in spaghetti sauce, or it's great cooked up by
itself for a main dish.

I also make regular breakfast sausage with deer meat, but I don't have a
recipe. I use Morton Sausage Seasoning. I think that it's 99.9% paleo
(has salt, sage, coriander and a few other spices), except for it also
lists dextrose as an ingredient-- the seasoning doesn't taste sweet, so
I consider it to be a very small amount. We like it, anyway.

These are good seasonings for any type of meat-- with the game meat,
remember that it is very lean so you have to add other fat. The flavor
is different with beef fat. We like the pork suet for sausage.

From: Julie Jarvis
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Smoked

Andouille

Andouille is the Cajun smoked sausage so famous nationally today.
Made with pork butt, shank and a small amount of pork fat, this
sausage is seasoned with salt, cracked black pepper and garlic. The
andouille is then slowly smoked over pecan wood and sugar cane. True
andouille is stuffed into the beef middle casing which makes the
sausage approximately one and a half inches in diameter. When smoked,
it becomes very dark to almost black in color. It is not uncommon
for the Cajuns to smoke andouille for seven to eight hours at
approximately 175 degrees.

Traditionally, the andouilles from France were made from the large
intestines and stomach of the pig, seasoned heavily and smoked. In
parts of Germany, where some say andouille originated, the sausage
was made with all remaining intestines and casings pulled through a
larger casing, seasoned and smoked. It was served thinly sliced as
an hors d'oeuvre.

It is interesting to note that the finest andouille in France comes
from the Brittany and Normandy areas. It is believed that over half
of the Acadian exiles who came to Louisiana in 1755 were originally
from these coastal regions.

5 pounds pork butt
1/2 pound pork fat
1/2 cup chopped garlic
1/4 cup cracked black pepper
2 tablespoons cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dry thyme
4 tablespoons salt
6 feet beef middle casing (see butcher or specialty shop)

Cube pork butt into one and a half inch cubes. Using a meat grinder with
four one quarter inch holes in the grinding plate, grind pork and pork fat.
If you do not have a grinding plate this size, I suggest hand cutting pork
butt into one quarter inch square pieces. Place ground pork in large mixing
bowl and blend in all remaining ingredients. Once well blended, stuff meat
into casings in one foot links, using the sausage attachment on your meat
grinder. Tie both ends of the sausage securely using a heavy gauge twine.
In your homestyle smoker, smoke andouille at 175-200 degrees F for
approximately four to five hours using pecan or hickory wood.The andouille
may then be frozen and used for seasoning gumbos, or grilling as an hors 
d'oeuvre.

Posted by Karl E. Moser (KE3NF) to rec.food.recipes on Oct 18, 1999.
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Andouille Sausage Making

  1 1/2    Yd large sausage casing
           Approx (2-3 in wide)
      4 lb Lean fresh pork
      2 lb Pork fat
  3 1/3 tb Finely minced garlic
      2 tb Salt
    1/2 ts Fresh grnd black pepper
    1/8 ts Cayenne
    1/8 ts Chili powder
    1/8 ts Mace
    1/8 ts Allspice
    1/2 ts Dried thyme
      1 tb Paprika
    1/4 ts Ground bay leaf
    1/4 ts Sage
      5 ts Liquid hickory smoke

Andouille was a great favorite in nineteenth-century New Orleans. This
thick Cajun sausage is made with lean pork and pork fat and lots of garlic.
Sliced about 1/2 inch thick and greilled, it makes a delightful appetizer.
It is also used in a superb oyster and andouille gumbo poplular in Laplace,
a Cajun town about 30 miles from New Orleans that calls itself the
Andouille Capital of the World.

Soak the casing about an hour in cold water to soften it and to loosen the
salt in which it is packed. Cut into 3 yard lengths, then place the narrow
end of the sausage stuffer in one end of the casing. Place the wide end of
the stuffer up against the sink faucet and run cold water through the
inside of the casing to remove any salt. (Roll up the casing you do not
intend to use; put about 2 inches of coarse salt in a large jar, place the
rolled up casing on it, then fill the rest of the jar with salt. Close
tightly and refrigerate for later use.)

Cut the meat and fat into chunks about 1/2 inch across and pass once
through the coarse blade of the meat grinder. Combine the pork with the
remaining ingredients in a large bowl and mix well with a wooden spoon.
Cut the casings into 26 inch lengths and stuff as follows: Tie a knot in
each piece of casing about 2 inches from one end. Fit the open end over the
tip of the sausage stuffer and slide it to about 1 inch from the wide end.
Push the rest of the casing onto the stuffer until the top touches the
knot. (The casing will look like accordian folds on the stuffer.) Fit the
stuffer onto the meat grinder as directed on the instructions that come
with the machine, or hold the wide end of the stuffer against or over the
opeoning by hand. Fill the hopper with stuffing. Turn the machine on if it
is electric and feed the stuffing gradually into the hopper; for a manual
machine, push the stuffing through with a wooden pestle. The sausage casing
will fill and inflate gradually. Stop filling about 1 1/4 inches from the
funnel end and slip the casing off the funnel, smoothing out any bumps
carefully with your fingers and being careful not to push the stuffing out
of the casing. Tie off the open end of the sausage tightly with a piece of
string or make a knot in the casing itself. Repeat until all the stuffing
is used up.

To cook, slice the andouille 1/2 inch thick and grill in a hot skillet with
no water for about 12 minutes on each side, until brown and crisp at the
edges.

(about 6 pounds of 20 inch sausage, 3 to 3 1/2 inches thick)

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on Apr 16, 1995.
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Andouille Sausage

 5      pounds        pork butt
   1/2  pound         pork fat
 5      cloves        garlic -- minced
   1/4  cup           cracked black pepper
 2      tablespoons   cayenne
 1      tablespoon    thyme
 4      tablespoons   salt
                      sausage casings, beef or pork

Cube pork butt into 1/2 inch cubes. using a meat grinder, with 1/4 inch
holes in the grinding plate, grind pork and pork fat. Place ground pork
into a large mixing bowl and add remaining ingredients. Mix well to
combine. Stuff into casings and tie int o one foot links using heavy gauge
twine. Place sausages into a smoker and smoke at 175 - 200 degrees for
about 4 - 5 hours, using hickory or pecan wood. Andouille may then be
frozen and used in gumbos, as hors d'oeuvre, or grilled and eaten as a 
sandwich.

NOTES: True Andouille is stuffed into the beef middle casing, which makes
it about 1 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter. It is slowly smoked over pecan wood
and sugar cane and will become very dark and almost black. It is not
uncommon for the Cajuns to smoke Andouille for 7 - 8 hours at temperatures
no higher than 175 degrees.

Recipe By: Chef John Folse
From: the recipe collection of Fred Towner
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Andouille Sausage

8 lb Pork Butt -- cubed
2 lb pork fat
1/2 cup garlic -- no germ
4 Tbsp salt
1 tsp ground pepper
1/4 tsp cayenne
1/4 tsp chili powder
1/4 tsp mace
1/4 tsp allspice
2 tsp thyme -- chopped fine
1/2 tsp sage -- dried

Combine dry ingredients. Mix with meat. Pass through large plate one time.
Add liquid and mix well. Pipe into 12" links.

Posted by Karl E. Moser (KE3NF) to rec.food.recipes on Nov 22, 1998.
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Andouille(2) Sausage Making

   4 lb Pork
   1 lb Tripe or chitterlings
   2    Garlic cloves
   3    Bay leaves
   2 lg Onions
   1 tb Salt (not iodized)
   1 tb Pepper
   1 ts Cayenne pepper
   1 ts Chili pepper
 1/2 ts Ground mace
 1/2 ts Ground cloves
 1/2 ts Ground allspice
   1 tb Minced thyme
   1 tb Minced marjoram
   1 tb Minced parsley

Pork should be approx 2 lbs fat and 2 lbs lean [usually Boston butt]. The
tripe is the inner lining of pork stomach and chitterlings (largest
intestine) may be used instead. You can use an extra pound of pork instead
of the tripe/chitterlings.

Chop, do not grind the meat. Mix with seasonings. Stuff into casings. Age
at least overnight and then smoke several hours using hickory, hackberry or
ash. (Do not use pine.) Throw anything sweet, such as cane sugar or syrup,
raw sugar, molassess, sugar cane or brown sugar on the wood before lighting.

Posted by Paul A. Meadows to rec.food.recipes on April 16, 1995.
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Salami

Salami is made from meats like wild meats or goat that might be though and
needs grinding or often tastes like a wild meat you aren't used to. The
spiciness covers the taste. don't use any fat from wild meat except bear
since the others have the wild flavor concentrated in the fat. Wild sausage
that's part pork or pork sausage makes a fine breakfast sausage. Wild meat
is generally extremely lean. so you can combine it with really fatty pieces
of pork and it will benefit. You can use 1/4 to one-third pork. Season,
grind up. I just bag it up in baggies, tie with the wires and freeze. Each
bag holds enough for a breakfast. When we have plenty of wild meat and pork
I make it by the kettlefull. You can add black whole peppers after your
grinding to make it authentic. Sage, allspice, garlic, ground cardamom
seed, and onion powder are all good in it. After the meat is seasoned if
you want you can stuff it into casings. Smoke about 48 hours. Smoking is no
substitute for cooking. Freeze it and cook it when you are ready for a
sausage meal.

From: Old Fashioned Recipe Book by Carla Emery.
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book cover image

Hungarian Sausage

   3 lb   Pork butt, boneless - cut into large pieces
   1 lb   Beef chuck, cut into large pieces
   1 lb   Pork fat, fresh - cut into large pieces
  10      Garlic cloves, peeled and crushed (about 2 Tbsp)
   1 cup  Water
   2 Tbsp Salt
 1/2 Tbsp Black pepper, freshly ground
   3 Tbsp Hungarian paprika
   1 tsp  Prague Powder #1
 1/4 tsp  Cloves, ground
  10 feet Sausage casing, 1" diameter

In a meat grinder, coarsely grind the pork, beef, and pork fat, in
batches. Add all remaining ingredients, except the casings. Mix well
and allow to sit while you clean the casings.
Rinse the casings thoroughly in cold water and run fresh water
through them. Drain.
Using a sausage machine, a KitchenAid with a sausage attachment,
or a sausage funnel, fill the casings and tie them off into about 16"
lengths. Do not fill them too tightly as they must have room to
expand when they cook.
Hang the sausages in a home style smoker and smoke them for about
1 hour. Do not allow the temperature of the smoker to go above 150 F.
Remove the sausages and hang over a stick or dowel. Put the stick
in a cool place and position an electric fan so that it will blow
directly on the sausages. Allow them to dry for 2 days. They are they
ready for use.
Place them in the refrigerator, where they will keep well for
about a week.

From: the recipe collection of Fred Towner
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Texas Hill Country Sausage

 4 lb Pork butt with fat
 2 lb Beef chuck or round -- with Fat
 1 lg Onion -- minced
 6    Cloves garlic -- minced
 2 tb Fresh sage -- minced
 1 tb Salt
 1 tb Fresh ground black pepper
 2 tb Crushed red pepper
 1 ts Cayenne
12 ft Hog casings

Coarse grind the meat. Mix in seasonings. Refrigerate over night. Prepare
casings. Stuff to 1" thick, 5"  long and tie off. They can be frozen or
refrigerated at this time

To smoke: rub sausages with oil. Don't over do it or they get messy and
then turn to mush. Smoke at 225 for two hours with oak or mesquite until
the skin looks ready to pop.

Recipe By: Smoke and Spice
From: Garry Howard
MM by Helen Peagram. Posted to rec.food.preserving

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Texas Smoky Links

   2 lb Pork butt
   1 lb Beef chuck
   1 ts Ground coriander
   2 ts Ground cumin
   2 ts Chopped garlic
   1 tb Ground black pepper
   2 ts Red pepper flakes
 1/2 c  Ice water
   4 ts Salt
     pn Ground allspice
     pn Ground cloves

Grind pork 3/8 plate-beef 1/4" plate- mix and stuff in hog casings -
8"links. Hot smoke to 155 degrees F or cold smoke at least 12 hours.

Recipe By: John "Smoky" Mitchell
From: Garry Howard
MM by Helen Peagram. Posted to rec.food.preserving
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Venison Sausage

 5 lb   Cubed venison
 1 lb   Cubed suet
 3 Tbsp Salt
 1 Tbsp Black pepper
 1 tsp  Red or cayenne pepper
 1 tsp  Paprika
 1 tsp  Sage
 2 tsp  Garlic powder
        Sausage casings

After grinding and mixing the venison and suet with the seasonings, fry a
small patty to check for taste. If it's too mild, add small amount of
red pepper until proper taste is reached; if it's too hot, add more
venison. Stuff in casings and smoke for 28 to 30 hours.

From: the recipe collection of Fred Towner
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