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Paleo/Primal Beverage Recipes

Page Contents:
Also see full chapter on making Paleo Nut Milks
Also see smoothies in chapter on Fruits: Blender


This is what I use (with mug):
Best Way to Brew Tea

brewing basket thumbnail

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Hot: Non-Apple

Chai - tea

In a sauce pan with a tight fitting lid combine the following:

8 cups water
6-10 quarter sized slices of fresh ginger root
10-15 cardamom pods, cracked open
1 teaspoon of fennel seeds
4 cloves
1 or 2 pieces of dried orange rind
8-10 black peppercorns

Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered for at least 20 minutes.
Simmer longer for a richer, spicier flavor. This tea can be sweetened with
raw honey. You can also add almond milk or coconut milk or add one green
tea bag for a stronger tea.

From: Patti Vincent
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picture
Feng Yu / 123RF Stock Photo 9660214

Simple Chai

1 1/2 cups water
1/2 inch cinnamon stick
4 cardamom pods
4 cloves

Optional:
1/2 teas fennel or anise seed
black peppercorn
1/2 bay leaf
coconut milk in place of some water

Put the water in a pan. Add the ingredients and bring to a boil. Cover,
turn heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes. Strain the tea into cup and
serve immediately.

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Grant Cochrane / FreeDigitalPhotos.net 10057606

Cranberry Tea

1 lb. cranberries
1/2 cup honey
2-1/2 qt. water
4 cinnamon sticks
2 tsp. whole cloves
1 cup orange juice

In covered saucepan, combine cranberries, honey, and water; simmer until
cranberries pop; add cinnamon sticks and cloves; continue to simmer until
it smells good. Add orange juice. Strain and keep juice (use pulp in other
recipes). 1 Tbsp. lemon juice can be added to tea, if desired. Serve warm.

From: Donna (in CA) (ladibugz77 at aol.com). posted in RFC
Adapted by Patti Vincent
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Maria Volosina / 123RF Stock Photo 7751280

Alternative Beverage "Coffee Substitute"

2 cups water
1 Tbs roasted chicory root
1 Tbs dried dandelion root (not roasted)
1/2 tsp cardamon seed (should be out of the husk, but not ground)

Put water in a pan. Add roasted chicory root, dandelion root, and cardamon
seed. Simmer gently 10 minutes. Strain and enjoy. I have found this is
pretty pleasant to drink. No it doesn't taste exactly like coffee
but it is dark and tasty and pretty good for you.

From: Lynnet Bannion on the PaleoFood list. Posted 14 Dec 1999.
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Alexander Raths / 123RF Stock Photo 13336383

Warming Winter Spice Tea

Decoct:
2 parts roasted dandelion root
1/2 part cinnamon bark
1/2 part dried gingerroot
1/2 part decorticated (hulled) cardamom seeds
1/2 part star anise
Raw honey to taste

Slowly heat 4 cups of spring water in a pot. Put the ingredients into a
mortar and with a pestle crush the herbs slightly. Or put them in a
blender and turn it on briefly, just enough to release some of the aromas.

From: Dandelion Medicine by Brigitte Mars.
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The-Weather-Is-Cold-and-I-Have-to-Be-Outside Tea

Decoct:
1 part roasted dandelion root
1 part gingerroot
1 part cinnamon bark
1/2 part licorice root
1/2 part prickly ash bark

Warm yourself with the circulation-supporting herbs in this blend.

From: Dandelion Medicine by Brigitte Mars.
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Vitamin C-Rich Tea

Infuse:
1 part dandelion leaf
1 part rose hip
1 part hibiscus flower
1 part raspberry leaf

These vitamin C-rich herbs are also high in flavonoids, which help improve
the body's assimilation of that nutrient.

From: Dandelion Medicine by Brigitte Mars.
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Postsurgery/Recovery Tea

Infuse:
1 part dandelion leaf
1 part nettle leaf

Decoct:
1 part dandelion root
1/2 part licorice root
1 part Siberian ginseng root

This is an excellent blend for cleansing drug residue out of the body and
building strength and energy.

From: Dandelion Medicine by Brigitte Mars.
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Lemon Tea

I enjoy the juice of one whole lemon in a cup of *very* (boiling) hot
water first thing in the morning. I believe Beverly & Vidal Sasson
recommend this in their book for good health.

From: Karen O'Mara in rec.food.cooking on Jan 7, 1999.
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Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net 10039387

Sassafras Tea

Wash roots of red sassafras taken in early spring. Boil pieces of the
roots. Serve hot or cold. Sweeten if desired. Boiled roots may be reused
until strength is gone.

From: Tom Kuhn, Native American archeologist
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picture
Don Wiss, from ForagingPictures.com

Sassafras Tea

Sassafras tea tastes amazingly like rootbeer-- in fact I think that
sassafras root is the ingredient that "root" beer is made from. I think
that old-fashioned sarsaparilla is soda made from sassafras. I bet you
could make a tea, then sweeten with honey, and you could use dry ice to
make it carbonated. I don't know if the dry ice is Paleo, but it's just
adding bubbles. We used to make rootbeer with rootbeer flavoring and water,
then put a about 1 pound of dry ice in a large container with it and wait a
couple of hours for it to get carbonated. I'll have to try it with the
sassafras tea.

From: Julie Jarvis. Posted to PaleoFood list 22 Jan 1999.
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Don Wiss, from ForagingPictures.com

Hot: With Caffeine

Hot Chocolate

3/4 cup pure coconut milk
1/4 cup water (If you use lite coconut milk DO NOT ADD WATER.)
1/2 tablespoon carob powder [not GRAP]
raw honey to taste (about 1/2 teaspoon)

Combine coconut milk, water and carob powder. Blend with a wire whisk, heat
on stove top or microwave. Add honey to taste.

From: Patti Vincent
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Liane Nothaft / 123RF Stock Photo 8629238

Spiced Green Tea

Add to your cup of green tea:
4 to 8 cloves
a dash of cinnamon
t raw honey
dried orange peal pieces (optional)

From: Patti Vincent
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digifuture / 123RF Stock Photo 9536694

Russian Tea

1 C of green tea
1/4 C orange juice
1 to 2 teas spiced honey

From: Patti Vincent
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digifuture / 123RF Stock Photo 9536694

Hot: Apple Based

Mulled Cider

2 quarts apple cider or juice
1 orange, sliced
1 lemon, sliced
2 Tbsp maple syrup or raw honey
4 sticks cinnamon
6 whole cloves
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
1/4 tsp. powdered ginger

In large saucepan, combine all of the ingredients. Bring mixture to a boil.
Reduce the heat to low, and simmer the cider for 30-40 minutes. Strain and
serve hot. Serves 16.

From: Diane Abell in 3 Rivers Cookbook III
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Holiday Wassail

Apricots lend golden color and goodness to this fruity beverage

1 can (16 ounces) apricot halves, undrained
4 cups unsweetened pineapple juice
2 cups apple cider
1 cup orange juice
18 whole cloves
6 cinnamon sticks (3-1/2 inches), broken
Additional cinnamon sticks, optional

In a blender or food processor, blend apricots and liquid until smooth.
Pour into a large saucepan. Add pineapple juice, cider and orange juice.
Place the cloves and cinnamon sticks in a double thickness of cheesecloth;
bring up corners of cloth and tie with a string to form a bag. Add to
saucepan. (Or place loose spices in saucepan and strain before serving.)
Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 15-20 minutes. Serve hot in
mugs. Garnish with cinnamon sticks if desired. Yield: 2 quarts.

From: http://cyou.com/~christmas/recipes/beverage.htm [now gone]
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duron123 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net 10082406

Wassail

LOTS of Apple Cider (Gallons?)
Perhaps 1/4 proportion of orange juice, or could use orange juice
concentrate.
Same thing with pineapple juice.
Some lemon juice.
Some raw honey (not too much needed)
Cinnamon sticks
Whole Cloves
perhaps other spices like powdered ginger

Bring to a boil until lots of frothy white foam, then simmer for at LEAST
an hour (how long depends on if you've used concentrates or not.) It should
reduce down to a nice thickness, and make the whole house smell wonderful!

From: Elena-Beth Kay
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Wassail

1 qt. apple cider
1 tsp. allspice
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
2 cinnamon sticks or 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/2 c. orange juice
2 tbsp. lemon juice
1/4 c. raw honey
2 tart apples, thinly sliced

In a 3 quart casserole, place cider, allspice, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon
sticks, orange juice, sugar and apples. Microwave on High (full power) for
15 to 18 minutes, until hot. Strain and serve.

From: http://www.enviroweb.org/vegweb/
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Wassail

7 c water
1 1/2 c orange juice
1 1/2 c apple cider
1 1/2 c tea
3/4 c  lemon juice
3/4 c raw honey (or less)
1/2 tsp each - allspice, ginger
4 cloves
2 large cinnamon sticks
1 can each pineapple, mandarin oranges
Optional:
raspberries or blueberries

Put spices in a tea ball or herb bag. Simmer all ingredients in crock pot
about 1 1/2 hrs before serving.

From: Ed in PA (ribes60 at aol.com)
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Apple Tea

Just as any tea: boil water, throw dried apple peels in (maybe let
it boil togethr for one minute), then leave it for five minutes,
and then drink. Either throw away peel or eat it. You can do like
this with any dried fruit/berries or peel.

From: Hans Kylberg on PaleoFood list. Posted 18 Apr 1999.
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Cold: Fruit: Hand Mixed

Apple Lemonade

2 cups unsweetened apple juice
4 tablespoons pure lemon juice

Combine juices. Chill. Serve over ice. Makes about 2 servings.

From: http://www.nlci.com/nutrition/recipe.htm [now redirects elsewhere]
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duron123 + Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Home-Made Strawberry Lemonade

8 cups water
1 cup fresh-cut strawberries
1 cup frozen strawberries
honey to taste
1 cup lemon juice
2 lemons sliced

In a large container, combine 4 cups of water and the fresh and frozen
strawberries. Let soak in the sun for 3-4 hours. In another container,
combine the lemon juice, sliced lemons and water. Chill for 3-4 hours to
let the lemon juice soak thru. Mix the 2 containers together, and add honey
to your taste. Serve chilled over ice.

From: Cooking with the Dead by Elizabeth Zipern
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Pink Drink

2 quarts spearmint or other tea
1 quart fresh apple cider
1 quart grape juice
juice of 2 lemons
honey to taste

Put in a large punch bowl with thin slices of lemon floating. Good for a
large group.

From Ten Talents Cookbook by Frank and Rosalie Hurd.
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Cold: Tomato

Tomato Sauce/Juice

Since many classic recipes call for tomato juice or tomato sauce, it's good
to know that you can make your own rather than rely on the canned varieties
that contain additives. To make tomato juice, simply puree tomatoes in a
blender, add lemon juice and salt. Strain the mixture for juice and retain
the pulp and a little juice to use in recipes calling for tomato juice.

From: Natural Foods Cookbook by Maxine Atwater
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Cold: Horchata

Real Horchata

REAL horchata is obtained by crushing chufas, leaving them in water
and sugar for about 24 hours and straining the mixture.

Chufas, cyperaceae cyperus esculentus as they go by their scientific
name, are a chick-pea sized tuberous roots of a sedge-like African
plant, with a brown skin and white flesh that I have never seen in any
other places than in Spanish or Mexican markets.

Rice or almond horchatas are only variants, and not even half as good as
the horchata de chufas.

From: Mathieu Wehrung in rec.food.cooking on Jul 24, 1996.
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Stanley Kays

Horchata

1 lb of Chufas
1 qt Water
Raw Honey to taste
Pinch of Cinnamon
Grated rind from 1/2 lemon

Clean the chufas and soak them in the 1 quart of water for 10 hours to
soften. Mash them in the water with a blender or by hand three times to
release all the juice. Filter the mixture through a fine collander and
throw away the residue. Add the sugar, cinnamon and lemon rind to the
liquid. Let the liquid rest overnight in the refrigerator.

I know the recipe is a little vague, but it gives you an idea how it's
made. Personally, I soak the lemon rind with the chufas so that it will be
filtered along with residue, that produces a cleaner milky texture.

From: calles@earthlink, rec.food.cooking, alt.creative-cook, May 11, 1996.
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